Why do moles need to be controlled

Moles can have a detrimental effect on Agriculture. Where grass is grown for silage this can become contaminated from bacteria in the soil from molehills. In turn this bacteria (lysteria and clostridium) is then consumed by livestock.

In pastureland, more molehills means less area for grass. Also weed growth becomes more prevalent due to the mole spoils.

Mole tunneling also damages roots of seedlings and plants.

Machinery for agriculture and domestic uses can also be damaged by stones dug up by moles. In paddocks, the presence of moles creates a hazard for horses as they are at risk from injury if the tunnel system collapses beneath them.

In domestic properties the presence of moles is also unsightly in a well kept lawn. This can cause complaints from neighbours if the mole territory extends to their property.

How Can Countrywide Help?

Moles have been the target of numerous attempts of control over centuries. Up until recently, the highly controversial use of ‘strychnine’ was permitted. The only ‘accepted’ methods of getting rid of moles is now ‘gassing’ with the use of aluminium phosphide products or ‘traditional mole catching methods’.

Countrywide only employ traditional mole catching methods. We find them more effective, you can see the moles we’ve caught for you and most importantly the mole trap is the most humane method of killing a mole.

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Why Countrywide?

  • Your local pest control service in Newbury, Reading, Bracknell, Basingstoke, Farnborough and Southampton
  • Fair pricing with fast, guaranteed results.
  • Full British Pest Control Association Member
  • Approved by local trading standards authorities 'buy with confidence' scheme
  • Which? Trusted Trader
  • Fully trained (BPCA) and insured with safe working practices
  • We offer a 100% Guarantee on our pest control treatments
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Contact the regional office:

0800 078 7255

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Contact the regional office:

0800 078 7280

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More about Moles

The European mole is light grey to black in colour and weighs between 110 and 120g. It has small barely visible eyes and ears hidden in its fur. Perhaps its most well known features are its powerful digging paws and small pink nose.

Latin name: Talpa europaea

Contrary to popular belief, moles are not blind. Their sight is of little use to them though as they spend almost their entire life in the darkness of their tunnel system. Moles have finely tuned senses to “feel” their way around. These include sensitive hairs on their face, feet and the tip of its tail called ‘vibrissae’.

Habitat

Moles are well known due to to the mounds of earth they produce through their quest for earth worms tunneling underneath the ground. The mole constructs its network of tunnels at extremely rapid rates. Its not uncommon to find an explosion in the number of mole hills over night!

Its not surprising though when you consider a mole needs to eat 80% of its own body weight every single day!

Moles can be found throughout mainland Britain although non existent in Ireland.

Life Cycle

The mole leads a solitary life for up to five years. It will defend its territory even against other moles.

The only time moles come into contact with each other is when they have the urge to mate at the end of February to the beginning of March each year. Mole activity can be seen to be moving as the male seeks out a female mole.

Gestation lasts about four weeks and the young are born in April, May and sometimes June. The male plays no part in the upbringing of the young and even the females contact with the young is very short lived. Before long the young are off to find their own territories and the cycle continues. This is also demonstrated by an increase in mole hills in September, October and it can be possible to catch several moles in close proximity to each other.

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